We’re Not Responsible

The following is an excellent excerpt from the book “THE GREAT UNRAVELING: Losing Our Way In The New Century” by Paul Krugman from Part Two “Fuzzy Math” in Chapter 6 “The Bait. . . “ on page 140 and I quote: “We’re Not ResponsibleOctober 18, 2000 – “However this election turns out, future historians are likely to see this as the year that America failed a big political test.
After decades of bipartisan irresponsibility, by the 1990s the United States had, miraculously, started to look like a grown-up nation–a nation able to plan ahead, to take advantage of good times to prepare for the rainier days to come. But it was an illusion: We were, it turns out, just playing at being grown-up.
The basic rule of fiscal responsibility for a national government is pretty much the same as the rule for a family: Pay off your debts and build up financial reserves when things are good, so that you can draw on those reserves later. And these are the best of times for America’s government, in at least three ways.
First, we are at peace, with no significant military rivals. You don’t have to believe in a new cold war to think that things are unlikely to stay this easy, that one way or another defense spending will eventually have to rise from its current low.
Second, our demography is as good as it’s going to be for the foreseeable future. The modern U.S. government is in large part in the business of insuring the income and medical expenses of older citizens. Starting just 10 years from now, the population eligible for Medicare and Social Security will start rising, and rising, and rising, with no end in sight. And so will the bills. If taxes on the diminishing fraction of our population that isn’t retired are to stay tolerable, we’d better start saving now.
Finally, right now the U.S. economy–and indirectly the federal budget–benefits from the perception in the rest of the world that America is the place to invest your money. Huge inflows of foreign capital have been keeping U.S. interest rates down and stock prices up, both of which also keep the money flowing into federal coffers. Some economists think that these capital inflows, like the similar inflows into Asian nations before 1997, are only setting us up for a future crisis–and I won’t say that I’m not worried. But even without a crisis we know that foreigners (and American investors too) will eventually discover more opportunities outside the United States, that the inflows will someday become outflows, and that we will be sorry if we haven’t prepared for that day.
So the responsible, sensible thing for the U.S. government to do is to run very big surpluses right now. Indeed, budget analysts who take the long view argue that even without the tax cuts and spending initiatives proposed by the presidential candidates we would not be running as large a surplus over the next decade as we should–that if anything we should be raising taxes and cutting spending.
But how do you explain that long view to the public? The truth is that our leaders never really tried. Instead, even politicians who were trying to be responsible resorted to half-truths. All that business about putting Social Security and Medicare in “lockboxes” is an attempt to sell fiscal responsiblity to the voters without really trying to explain why it is necessary. So maybe we should not be surprised that we have ended up with the worst of all worlds. On one side the public feels, correctly, that politicians like Al Gore, who use those half-truths to push for half-responsible policies, are talking down to them. On the other side the public feels, quite wrongly, that politicians like George W. Bush, who tell them that they can have their cake and eat it too, are men of the people.
Mr. Bush’s willingness to trust in the public’s innumeracy continues to boggle the mind. In the second debate he offered possibly the biggest misrepresentation yet, this time declaring about his tax plan that “most of tax reductions go to the people at the bottom end of the economic ladder.” (That sound you hear is the giggling of millionaires and the guffawing of multimillionaires.)
But the gleefulness of the crowds who picked up that Orwellian chant of “no fuzzy numbers” (Orwellian because what it really meant was “no clear numbers–we don’t want to know”) suggests that this country just wasn’t ready for the hard thinking that would have let us act responsibly. Maybe better politicians could have made a better case for the right policies. Or maybe the fault is not in our politicians but in ourselves.”
(AFTER WATCHING THE MOVIE, “TOO BIG TO FAIL” FEATURING TREASURY SECRETARY HANK PAULSON, WHO GOT DOWN ON HIS KNEES AND BEGGED TO SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE, NANCY PELOSI, TO SAVE OUR BANKING SYSTEM, WHICH THE REPUBLICANS GOT THEM INTO TWO MONTHS BEFORE PRES GEORGE W BUSH LEFT OFFICE. AND HE CAME UP WITH THAT POOR EXCUSE? THE REPUBLICANS SHOULD TO BE ASHAMED OF THEMSELVES–CALLING THEMSELVES A POLITICAL PARTY.
THE FOLLOWING IS A QUOTE FROM THE BACK COVER AND I QUOTE:
“You need to read this book, and when you do, you’ll find there’s only one possible response: it’s time to get mad, for most of the media are in denial about how far the takeover of this country by the radical right has already progressed.”
–MOLLY IVINS

LaVern Isely, Progressive, Overtaxed Independent Middle Class Taxpayer and Public Citizen Member and USAF Veteran

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About tim074

I'm a retired dairy farmer that was a member of the National Farmer's Organization (NFO). Before going farming, I spent 4 years in the United States Air Force where I saved up enough money to get my down payment to go farming. I also enjoy writing and reading biographies and I write about myself as well as articles and excerpts I find interesting. I'm specifically interested in finances, particularly in the banking industry because if it wasn't for help from my local Community Bank, I never could have started farming which I was successful at. So, I'm real interested in the Small Business Administration and I know they are the ones creating jobs. I have been a member of Common Cause and am now a member of Public Citizen as well as AARP. I have, in the past, written over 150 articles on the Obama Blog (my.barackobama.com) and I'd like to tie these two sites together. I'm also on Twitter, MySpace and Facebook and find these outlets terrifically interesting particularly what many of these people did concerning the uprising in the Arab world. I believe this is a smaller world than we think it is and my goal is to try to bring people together to live in peace because management needs labor like labor needs management. Up to now, that hasn't been so easy to find.
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